What does Autism Awareness Day mean to you?

world_autism_dayChildren are incredible teachers. They teach us patience, simplicity, honesty, and love. But children with autism?

Well, they add an entire new layer to the world, enriching the lives of those around them in a truly incredible way.

Over the years, I have met some amazing and inspirational little beings. I have learned to see the world in an entirely new light. Because of my students with autism, I now notice more details around me, including fonts, patterns in nature, lighting, and different sounds. Those things have always been there, but my students have trained me to actually notice the details.

I am so thankful that these precious children have helped me observe the world going on around me. I have always been so incredibly grateful for my life, my family and friends, and for this beautiful world that we live in. However, children with autism have helped me see things that I don’t think I would have noticed before.

Everyone has so much to offer and give. We just have to be open to their gifts.

As Autism Awareness Day is in just a few days on April 2nd, I have been thinking about what it really means to me.

Autism Awareness is about helping communities around the world accept ALL people, regardless of ability or disability.

This day is about educating restaurants, stores, theaters, schools, and other places in our communities how to modify their environments to meet the needs of people who have sensory sensitivities.

Most importantly, I believe that this day is about creating a world, where your children can grow up, filled with love, acceptance, awareness, and peace.

Please click here and share with us:

What does Autism Awareness Day mean to you?

Have a beautiful day,

Jen

P.S. Doors are now open to the Sensory Club for parents. If you are interested in being part of a group where you receive weekly strategies and activities to help your child, click here to learn more.

 

The Sensory Club

For parents who are trying to help their children with autism navigate an overwhelming sensory world.

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